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Brooklyn Bridge ELA.7.R.C1.4

Quiz by Anita Proffitt

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3 questions
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  • Q1
    The Brooklyn Bridge Prior to 1883, there was only one way to commute between Brooklyn and Manhattan. You had to take a ferry. This mode of transportation was considerably unreliable. The East River was often too treacherous in the wintertime, causing the ferries to be out of service. In 1855, John Roebling, a German immigrant, stood impatiently waiting for a ferry. While gazing across the river, he envisioned a bridge spanning two islands. Roebling was a notable bridge designer. He immediately went to work on drafting the plans. Finally, in 1870, construction on the bridge commenced. Upon completion, the Brooklyn Bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world, measuring 6,106 feet in length. On May 23, 1883, the bridge was dedicated. During the early years, the Brooklyn Bridge was used by trolleys, horse-drawn carriages, and livestock! Pedestrians also utilized the bridge. There was a one-cent toll to traverse it. The Brooklyn Bridge is a National Historical Landmark. Trolleys and livestock no longer cross the bridge; now, the bridge’s six-lane highway transports thousands of autos instead. Pedestrians walk across the bridge on an elevated platform. Since the toll was eliminated in 1910, people can now traverse the bridge for free. The most desirable part about crossing the bridge on foot is the breathtaking views of Lower Manhattan. 1. What is this passage mostly about?
    John Roebling
    Lower Manhattan
    The East River
    The Brooklyn Bridge
    30s
  • Q2
    The Brooklyn Bridge Prior to 1883, there was only one way to commute between Brooklyn and Manhattan. You had to take a ferry. This mode of transportation was considerably unreliable. The East River was often too treacherous in the wintertime, causing the ferries to be out of service. In 1855, John Roebling, a German immigrant, stood impatiently waiting for a ferry. While gazing across the river, he envisioned a bridge spanning two islands. Roebling was a notable bridge designer. He immediately went to work on drafting the plans. Finally, in 1870, construction on the bridge commenced. Upon completion, the Brooklyn Bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world, measuring 6,106 feet in length. On May 23, 1883, the bridge was dedicated. During the early years, the Brooklyn Bridge was used by trolleys, horse-drawn carriages, and livestock! Pedestrians also utilized the bridge. There was a one-cent toll to traverse it. The Brooklyn Bridge is a National Historical Landmark. Trolleys and livestock no longer cross the bridge; now, the bridge’s six-lane highway transports thousands of autos instead. Pedestrians walk across the bridge on an elevated platform. Since the toll was eliminated in 1910, people can now traverse the bridge for free. The most desirable part about crossing the bridge on foot is the breathtaking views of Lower Manhattan. 2. Why did John Roebling want to build the Brooklyn Bridge?
    He wanted a faster, more reliable way between two places.
    He hated ferries.
    He was dedicated.
    He wanted to build a National Historical Landmark.
    30s
  • Q3
    The Brooklyn Bridge Prior to 1883, there was only one way to commute between Brooklyn and Manhattan. You had to take a ferry. This mode of transportation was considerably unreliable. The East River was often too treacherous in the wintertime, causing the ferries to be out of service. In 1855, John Roebling, a German immigrant, stood impatiently waiting for a ferry. While gazing across the river, he envisioned a bridge spanning two islands. Roebling was a notable bridge designer. He immediately went to work on drafting the plans. Finally, in 1870, construction on the bridge commenced. Upon completion, the Brooklyn Bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world, measuring 6,106 feet in length. On May 23, 1883, the bridge was dedicated. During the early years, the Brooklyn Bridge was used by trolleys, horse-drawn carriages, and livestock! Pedestrians also utilized the bridge. There was a one-cent toll to traverse it. The Brooklyn Bridge is a National Historical Landmark. Trolleys and livestock no longer cross the bridge; now, the bridge’s six-lane highway transports thousands of autos instead. Pedestrians walk across the bridge on an elevated platform. Since the toll was eliminated in 1910, people can now traverse the bridge for free. The most desirable part about crossing the bridge on foot is the breathtaking views of Lower Manhattan. 3. Which of the following did John Roebling do first, after waiting for a ferry in 1855?
    Drove his car across the bridge
    Dedicated the bridge
    Stood restlessly
    Drafted plans for the bridge
    30s

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