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ELA.7.R.C2.5 All Together Now

Quiz by Anita Proffitt

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3 questions
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  • Q1
    From “All Together Now” by Barbara Jordan When I look at race relations today I can see that some positive changes have come about. But much remains to be done, and the answer does not lie in more legislation. We have the legislation we need; we have the laws. Frankly, I don’t believe that the task of bringing us all together can be accomplished by government. What we need now is soul force—the efforts of people working on a small scale to build a truly tolerant, harmonious society. And parents can do a great deal to create that tolerant society…. What can parents do? We can put our faith in young people as a positive force. I have yet to find a racist baby. Babies come into the world as blank slates and, with their beautiful innocence, see others not as different but as enjoyable companions. Children learn ideas and attitudes from adults who nurture them. I absolutely believe that children do not adopt prejudices unless they absorb them from their parents or teachers. The best way to get this country faithful to the American dream of tolerance and equality is to start small. Parents can actively encourage their children to be in the company of people who are of other racial and ethnic backgrounds. If a child thinks, “Well, that person’s color is not the same as mine, but she must be okay because she likes to play with the same things I like to play with,” that child will grow up with a broader view of humanity. 1. According to the above article, which of the following plays the greatest role in improving race relations?
    Children
    Government
    Laws
    Parents
    30s
  • Q2
    From “All Together Now” by Barbara Jordan When I look at race relations today I can see that some positive changes have come about. But much remains to be done, and the answer does not lie in more legislation. We have the legislation we need; we have the laws. Frankly, I don’t believe that the task of bringing us all together can be accomplished by government. What we need now is soul force—the efforts of people working on a small scale to build a truly tolerant, harmonious society. And parents can do a great deal to create that tolerant society…. What can parents do? We can put our faith in young people as a positive force. I have yet to find a racist baby. Babies come into the world as blank slates and, with their beautiful innocence, see others not as different but as enjoyable companions. Children learn ideas and attitudes from adults who nurture them. I absolutely believe that children do not adopt prejudices unless they absorb them from their parents or teachers. The best way to get this country faithful to the American dream of tolerance and equality is to start small. Parents can actively encourage their children to be in the company of people who are of other racial and ethnic backgrounds. If a child thinks, “Well, that person’s color is not the same as mine, but she must be okay because she likes to play with the same things I like to play with,” that child will grow up with a broader view of humanity. 2. How does the author characterize children in this article?
    Innocent
    Curious
    Prejudiced
    Talkative
    30s
  • Q3
    From “All Together Now” by Barbara Jordan When I look at race relations today I can see that some positive changes have come about. But much remains to be done, and the answer does not lie in more legislation. We have the legislation we need; we have the laws. Frankly, I don’t believe that the task of bringing us all together can be accomplished by government. What we need now is soul force—the efforts of people working on a small scale to build a truly tolerant, harmonious society. And parents can do a great deal to create that tolerant society…. What can parents do? We can put our faith in young people as a positive force. I have yet to find a racist baby. Babies come into the world as blank slates and, with their beautiful innocence, see others not as different but as enjoyable companions. Children learn ideas and attitudes from adults who nurture them. I absolutely believe that children do not adopt prejudices unless they absorb them from their parents or teachers. The best way to get this country faithful to the American dream of tolerance and equality is to start small. Parents can actively encourage their children to be in the company of people who are of other racial and ethnic backgrounds. If a child thinks, “Well, that person’s color is not the same as mine, but she must be okay because she likes to play with the same things I like to play with,” that child will grow up with a broader view of humanity. 3. What does the author emphasize about parents?
    Their upbringing
    Their discipline
    Their responsibility
    Their social class
    30s

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