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Emily Dickinson poetry

Quiz by Deb Brunswick

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21 questions
Show answers
  • Q1
    From her biography, you know that Emily did not communicate much with the world outside of her own home. So, what has become her "letter to the world according to "This is my Letter to the World"?
    her last will and testament
    her letter to a local newspaper
    her inability to communicate
    her poetry
    60s
  • Q2
    The poet suggests that the source of her message is
    her own imagination
    America
    the world
    nature
    60s
  • Q3
    Who are the "hands" she cannot see?
    her sister's
    nature's
    her own
    her readers'
    60s
  • Q4
    According to the first stanza of "Success is Counted Sweetest," who finds success most sweet?
    those who always succeed
    those who don't want success
    those who never succeed
    those who find nature
    60s
  • Q5
    What way are stanzas 2 and 3 related to line 1 and 2 of the same poem?
    they contract lines 1 and 2
    they poke fun at the idea expressed in lines 1 and 2
    they illustrate lines 1 and 2 with a specific example
    60s
  • Q6
    Who would the speaker of this poem most probably ask about the importance of winning an Olympic gold medal?
    a person who wins one
    a coach
    a person who fails to win one
    a poet
    60s
  • Q7
    The speaker in "Because I Could not Stop for Death," describes
    the day she died
    the day she was born
    the death of a loved one
    the cruelty of death
    60s
  • Q8
    What all does Death's carriage hold?
    Death and Immortality
    the speaker and Death
    the speaker, Death, and Immortality
    just the speaker
    60s
  • Q9
    What character trait is ironically given to Death in line 8?
    quickness
    politeness
    leisure
    rudeness
    60s
  • Q10
    What three things does the speaker pass in Stanza 3?
    school, fields of corn, setting moon
    children, fields of corn, rising moon
    recess, fields of grain, rising sun
    school, fields of grain, setting sun
    60s
  • Q11
    These images might represent
    four ways of viewing the world
    the stages of the speaker's life
    nature
    the speaker's lost youth
    60s
  • Q12
    What is the "Swelling of the Ground" in line 18?
    a roof
    a grave
    a house
    a decoration
    60s
  • Q13
    How long has it been since Death stopped for her?
    two months
    a single day
    eternity
    centuries
    60s
  • Q14
    The poem suggests that each century of immortal life is shorter than a
    day
    week
    year
    month
    60s
  • Q15
    Death in this poem behaves
    courteously
    cruelly
    hastily
    rudely
    60s

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