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EOC-RG: Section 5 - Legislative Branch

Quiz by Garry Hagedorn

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12 questions
Show answers
  • Q1
    What is the primary function of the legislative branch?
    to make law
    to have two chambers (bicameral)
    to have a Senate
    to have a House of Representatives
    30s
  • Q2
    What is a bicameral legislature?
    A legislative body composed of one chamber. In the United States Congress, the chamber is called the Senate.
    A legislative body composed of one chamber. In the United States Congress, the chamber is called the House of Representatives.
    A legislative body composed of two chambers. In the United States Congress, those chambers are called the House of Representatives and the Senate.
    A legislative body composed of one chamber. In the United States Congress, those chambers are called the House of Representatives and the Senate.
    30s
  • Q3
    What are the qualifications and term office for the House of Representatives?
    Twenty-five years old, seven years a U.S. citizen, live in state where elected.
    Fifty years old, nine years a U.S. citizen, inhabit state where elected.
    Thirty years old, nine years a U.S. citizen, inhabit state where elected.
    Forty years old, nine years a U.S. citizen, inhabit state where elected.
    30s
  • Q4
    What is the “necessary and proper clause” (also known as the elastic clause)?
    means to bring formal charges against a public official; the House of Representatives has the sole power to impeach civil officers of the United States.
    Various tactics (usually long speeches) aimed at defeating a bill in a legislative body by preventing a final vote, it is associated with the U.S. Senate.
    The Constitutional clause that gives Congress the power to make all laws “necessary and proper” for executing its powers. See Implied Powers.
    A type of veto a chief executive may use after a legislature has adjourned; when the chief executive does not sign or reject a bill within the time allowed to do so.
    30s
  • Q5
    Who is the chair of the House?
    A bill is passed in the House, and passed in the Senate.
    Chief executive’s power to reject a bill passed by a legislature.
    The Speaker of the House
    Vice President. The President Pro Tempore serves in his absence.
    30s
  • Q6
    Who is the chair of the Senate?
    a U.S. citizen, inhabit state where elected.
    The Speaker of the House
    Vice President. The President Pro Tempore serves in his absence.
    seven years a U.S. citizen, live in state where elected.
    30s
  • Q7
    Describe how a bill becomes law:
    A type of veto a chief executive may use after a legislature has adjourned; when the chief executive does not sign or reject a bill within the time allowed to do so.
    Various tactics (usually long speeches) aimed at defeating a bill in a legislative body by preventing a final vote, it is associated with the U.S. Senate.
    Chief executive’s power to reject a bill passed by a legislature.
    A bill is passed in the House, and passed in the Senate. Bill is sent to conference committee if they need to negotiate to get exact same wording. Conference bill goes back to each chamber for passage. Once both chambers approve, the originating chamber forwards to the President for his approval.
    30s
  • Q8
    What is a veto?
    means to bring formal charges against a public official; the House of Representatives has the sole power to impeach civil officers of the United States.
    Chief executive’s power to reject a bill passed by a legislature.
    A type of veto a chief executive may use after a legislature has adjourned; when the chief executive does not sign or reject a bill within the time allowed to do so.
    Various tactics (usually long speeches) aimed at defeating a bill in a legislative body by preventing a final vote, it is associated with the U.S. Senate.
    30s
  • Q9
    What is a pocket veto?
    Chief executive’s power to reject a bill passed by a legislature.
    A type of veto a chief executive may use after a legislature has adjourned; when the chief executive does not sign or reject a bill within the time allowed to do so.
    Various tactics (usually long speeches) aimed at defeating a bill in a legislative body by preventing a final vote, it is associated with the U.S. Senate.
    means to bring formal charges against a public official; the House of Representatives has the sole power to impeach civil officers of the United States.
    30s
  • Q10
    What is a filibuster?
    Once both chambers approve, the originating chamber forwards to the President for his approval.
    Various tactics (usually long speeches) aimed at defeating a bill in a legislative body by preventing a final vote, it is associated with the U.S. Senate.
    means to bring formal charges against a public official; the House of Representatives has the sole power to impeach civil officers of the United States.
    A type of veto a chief executive may use after a legislature has adjourned; when the chief executive does not sign or reject a bill within the time allowed to do so.
    30s
  • Q11
    What is impeachment?
    Various tactics (usually long speeches) aimed at defeating a bill in a legislative body by preventing a final vote, it is associated with the U.S. Senate.
    A type of veto a chief executive may use after a legislature has adjourned; when the chief executive does not sign or reject a bill within the time allowed to do so.
    Chief executive’s power to reject a bill passed by a legislature.
    means to bring formal charges against a public official; the House of Representatives has the sole power to impeach civil officers of the United States.
    30s
  • Q12
    What are the steps for impeachment?
    means to bring formal charges against a public official; the House of Representatives has the sole power to impeach civil officers of the United States.
    Various tactics (usually long speeches) aimed at defeating a bill in a legislative body by preventing a final vote, it is associated with the U.S. Senate.
    A type of veto a chief executive may use after a legislature has adjourned; when the chief executive does not sign or reject a bill within the time allowed to do so.
    A House Committee debates charges then votes (simple majority) on whether to send Articles of Impeachment to the Full House; the full House acts like a grand jury & considers charges brought by Committee.........they may subpeona witnesses and evidence and also hear/debate arguments; the House then votes on each Article.......if approved by majority vote the official is impeached which is similar to being indicted. If Articles of Impeachment pass, they are then sent to the Senate for trial.
    30s

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