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Grade 8 - “I Hear America Singing” by Walt Whitman and “I, Too, Sing America” by Langston Hughes

Quiz by Common Core - ELA - Grade 8

Grade 8
English Language Arts
Common Core

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16 questions
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  • Q1
    Part A: Which excerpt from Text 1, “I Hear America Singing,” best conveys its overall theme?
    “The day what belongs to the day—at night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly”
    “Each singing what belongs to him or her and to no one else,”
    “The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam,”
    “The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work,”
    45s
    RL.8.2
  • Q2
    Part B: How does the idea of carols help develop the theme of Text 1?
    As each American worker sings a new carol, he or she becomes more effective at his or her job.
    The beauty of America grows as each worker contributes his or her own carol.
    The American worker grows more powerful as he shares his or her own carol.
    As each carol is introduced, more opportunities open up for Americans.
    45s
    RL.8.2
  • Q3
    How does the structure of the poem contribute to its overall meaning?
    The gradual increase in line length accentuates the important role that women play in creating America’s strength.
    The list of a wide variety of workers highlights the unique contribution each worker makes to America.
    The inconsistent line length emphasizes the novelty of each worker’s contribution to America.
    The repeated references to songs develop the idea that each worker performs a similar function in American society.
    45s
    RL.8.5
  • Q4
    How does the description of the songs as “strong” in Line 3 of Text 1 impact the meaning of the poem?
    It demonstrates a hope for a brighter future, felt by American laborers when they finish their work.
    It reveals the belief that America is only powerful as long as each worker contributes.
    It emphasizes the greatness of America, created through individual workers.
    It highlights the joy that American laborers feel as they complete their daily tasks.
    45s
    RL.8.4
  • Q5
    In Text 1, reread lines 1–2 and 15–18. Which of these words contribute to a joyous tone?
    "varied"
    "strong"
    "mouths"
    "blithe"
    45s
    RL.8.4
  • Q6
    Part A: Which theme is conveyed in Text 2, Hughes’s poem?
    All people in America share similar experiences and lead similar lives.
    To Americans, health and happiness should be of greatest importance.
    Americans must make the effort to spend more time with their loved ones.
    America must celebrate all of its members, not just a select group.
    45s
    RL.8.2
  • Q7
    Part B: Which excerpt from Text 2 best demonstrates this theme?
    I, too, am America.
    Tomorrow,/ I’ll be at the table
    But I laugh,/And eat well,
    I am the darker brother.
    45s
    RL.8.2
  • Q8
    In Text 2, how does the shift in setting from the kitchen to the table in Stanza 2 to Stanza 3 mainly impact the poem?
    It reflects the speaker’s determination and desire for progress.
    It reveals the speaker’s decision to develop deeper friendships.
    It warns that humans must strive to make fewer demands of one another.
    It proves that the ideals and values of the nation have already changed.
    45s
    RL.8.3
  • Q9
    Part A: In Stanza 2 and in Stanza 4 of Hughes’s poem, the speaker uses the word “they.” Who is the “they” that the speaker refers to?
    his enemies and rivals
    people who are from other countries
    his family and friends
    people who are different from him
    45s
    RL.8.4
  • Q10
    Part B: Why is it important that the speaker does not define exactly who “they” are?
    It holds the focus of the poem on its subject, which is the speaker himself.
    It protects the speaker’s relationships by not offending one specific group.
    It invites people everywhere to be part of the speaker’s concept of America.
    It keeps readers interested in the poem by maintaining their curiosity.
    45s
    RL.8.4
  • Q11
    In the poem “I, Too, Sing America,” what is the effect of using simple language and short lines?
    Emphasizes the central idea of the poem
    Foreshadows differences between the speaker’s present reality and his intended future
    Heightens the impact of each individual word or phrase
    Reflects the speaker’s feelings of individuality and independence
    45s
    RL.8.5
  • Q12
    In the poem “I, Too, Sing America,” what is the effect of using transitional words (But, Tomorrow, Besides)?
    Heightens the impact of each individual word or phrase
    Emphasizes the central idea of the poem
    Reflects the speaker’s feelings of individuality and independence
    Foreshadows differences between the speaker’s present reality and his intended future
    45s
    RL.8.5
  • Q13
    In the poem “I, Too, Sing America,” what is the effect of using similar language in the first and last lines (I, too, sing America/I, too, am America)?
    Emphasizes the central idea of the poem
    Foreshadows differences between the speaker’s present reality and his intended future
    Reflects the speaker’s feelings of individuality and independence
    Heightens the impact of each individual word or phrase
    45s
    RL.8.5
  • Q14
    In the poem “I, Too, Sing America,” what is the effect of using varying numbers of lines in each stanza?
    Reflects the speaker’s feelings of individuality and independence
    Heightens the impact of each individual word or phrase
    Foreshadows differences between the speaker’s present reality and his intended future
    Emphasizes the central idea of the poem
    45s
    RL.8.5
  • Q15
    Which statement explain how the point of view of the speaker of Text 1 compares or contrasts with that of Text 2?
    Whitman’s speaker believes only positive things about life in America, while Hughes’s speaker has an entirely negative view about life in America.
    Whitman’s speaker speaks from a point of view of one who feels valued as an American, while Hughes’ speaker does not.
    Whitman’s speaker mainly discusses the challenges of being an American, while Hughes’s speaker mainly discusses the benefits of being an American
    Whitman’s speaker and Hughes’s speaker describe the lives of both American men and women.
    45s
    RL.8.6

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