Quizalize logo
placeholder image to represent content

Refining the introduction and developing body paragraphs

Quiz by Cinco Delgado

Feel free to use or edit a copy

includes Teacher and Student dashboards

Measure skills
from any curriculum

Tag the questions with any skills you have. Your dashboard will track each student's mastery of each skill.

With a free account, teachers can
  • edit the questions
  • save a copy for later
  • start a class game
  • view complete results in the Gradebook and Mastery Dashboards
  • automatically assign follow-up activities based on students’ scores
  • assign as homework
  • share a link with colleagues
  • print as a bubble sheet
12 questions
Show answers
  • Q1
    What do effective introductions do? Effective introductions do three things: 1) they establish a context for your essay; 2) they clearly state what the essay is about; and 3) they (usually) give readers a sense of the points you’ll be making in the essay. If your paper is relatively short (5 pages or less), you can do all of this in one paragraph. If your paper is longer, you might use multiple paragraphs for an introduction.
    Establish the context, clearly state what the essay is about; give readers a sense of the points you will be making.
    Establish the conditions, vaguely state what the essay will be about, and let readers guess about the points being made.
    Establish the characters, provide a background of the setting, and tells the reader what to think.
    60s
    Edit
    Delete
  • Q2
    What is this part of the introduction? It tells me a little bit about the background of the essay. You should use one or more sentences to express something that you’ve learned about your topic, from the research you’ve done, that will help readers to understand the context and purpose of your essay.
    Claims and Counter Claims
    Thesis
    Context
    60s
    Edit
    Delete
  • Q3
    What part of the introduction is this? Gives readers a sense of what points will be addressed in the essay. You don’t want to give away all of the details, nor do you want to get too in-depth about any of your points. Save your analysis/ argument for your body paragraphs. But you do want to give your readers some general ideas about what points you will discuss/ examine/ argue in your essay.
    Context
    Thesis
    Points of the essay
    60s
    Edit
    Delete
  • Q4
    What part of the introduction is this? Clearly states what the essay will be about.
    Points of the essay
    Thesis
    Context
    30s
    Edit
    Delete
  • Q5
    Where in the essay do you make your case? Now we’re going to write the body paragraphs of our essay. You make your case in these paragraphs–you make a convincing, well-supported argument for your reader. You want to gather together all of the facts, reasoning, and other evidence to put into this section in order to best make your case.
    Body paragraphs
    Introduction
    Conclusion
    60s
    Edit
    Delete
  • Q6
    What is the best way to organize a persuasive essay? Perhaps the most crucial point I can make here, and what many students find frustrating, is that there really is no best way of organizing your argument in your body paragraphs. If a particular assignment calls for a certain type of argument, such as compare and contrast, then use that, of course. But different types of organization can often work equally well within the same essay–it all depends on how you support your points. For example, I can make a persuasive essay using compare/ contrast (by comparing/ contrasting reasons to do one thing and not do another), just as effectively as I can by asking and answering questions about whether or not to do something. It all depends on how you put it together. I recommend that you stick with the method that feels most comfortable to you, or with the method that you understand best. There is no formula for this; you’ll just have to practice with it.
    There really isn’t one. Do what feels most comfortable
    To answer questions
    To compare and contrast
    120s
    Edit
    Delete
  • Q7
    What is a compare and contrast organization for a body paragraph? One way to organize and analyze your points is through compare and contrast. Compare/ contrast works well if you are discussing at least two different examples, concepts, etc. Compare/ contrast helps you to make your case by offering examples and non-examples of your points. One way to organize and analyze your points is through compare and contrast. Compare/ contrast works well if you are discussing at least two different examples, concepts, etc. Compare/ contrast helps you to make your case by offering examples and non-examples of your points.
    Facts and Opinions of your argument
    Summarize the points and counter points
    Provide examples and non-examples of your argument
    120s
    Edit
    Delete
  • Q8
    What is the question and answer method of organization for a body paragraph? Another way of arranging your argument is by question and answer.  In this method, you simply ask one or more questions and then proceed to provide answers to those questions.  This method helps to focus your readers’ attention through the question and answer process.  The method makes it easy to address your points, and the questions often create the context for you, but the risk is that your essay will read like a list and not like a discussion.
    Going over point by point for and against your argument
    Examples and Non Examples of your argument
    Ask one or more questions then proceed to provide an answer
    120s
    Edit
    Delete
  • Q9
    What is the point by point method of organization for a body paragraph? Perhaps the most well-known way of making an argument is to list your points one by one.  This method is similar to the “Question and Answer” format, except that you don’t begin with questions.  You still need to provide context to your readers, however.  The difficulty with this method is stating a general point that you then discuss in detail.
    Provide examples and non examples of your argument
    List the points one by one
    Ask one or more questions then proceed to provide an answer
    120s
    Edit
    Delete
  • Q10
    What is the structure of this paragraph? Defining quality in teaching is unusually difficult. Were anyone serious about this issue, they would soon realize that quality is an ineffable concept, as the best-selling book by Pirsig (1974) made clear.  Defining quality always requires value judgments about which disagreements abound.  Studying teaching cross-culturally makes this evident (Alexander, 2000).  A high-quality teacher in India does not allow questioning by students.  Students simply listen for hours on end.  The opposite is true in many American classes, where students are expected to raise questions during class.  Alexander (2000) found that maintaining discipline is not part of any definition of quality in Russia or India because there are almost no discipline problems in their schools.  But in the organizationally complex world of American and British schools, with individualization of some activities, promotion of collaboration and negotiation, and a concern for students’ feelings, there is a greater incidence of behavior problems.  Thus, American and British teachers of high quality must have classroom management skills that are unnecessary in Russia or India. (Berliner, 2005)
    question and answer
    compare/contrast
    point by point
    120s
    Edit
    Delete
  • Q11
    What is the structure of this paragraph? But what do we know about Socrates and the method he used to interrogate Athenians in the agora?  And what are we talking about when we call it the “Socratic method?”  As it turns out, we may be mistaking common phrasing for common practice.  After all, classrooms in which the Socratic method is ostensibly employed are hardly all the same.  Teachers are at the center of some and at the periphery of others.  Talk is common in all, but it includes chaotic zigzagging in one class and linear directionality in another.  Socratic classrooms can be relaxed or tense, loud or quiet, large or small.  They can, in other words, seem as different from each other as they seem from classes in which other methods are the basis of instruction. (Schneider, 2012)
    point by point
    compare and contrast
    question and answer
    120s
    Edit
    Delete
  • Q12
    What is the structure of this paragraph? The first part of the outcomes trap is equating both pupils’ learning and teacher quality with test scores.  Increasingly, under the current educational regime, this is the case.  This equation is far too simplistic a way to conceptualize the complexities of teaching and learning.  Teaching does not simply involve transmitting bits of information that can be tested, and learning is not just receiving information about subject matter.  Both are far more complex.  In addition, schools and teacher education programs have purposes in addition to pupils’ academic learning, including their social and emotional development and their ability to participate in a democratic society.  To represent all of the complex aspects involved in teacher quality and pupils’ learning in one number derived from increases in achievement test scores is a trap – it reflects impoverished notions of teaching and learning not at all in keeping with research or experience in these areas and ignores broader commitments. (Cochran-Smith, 2005)
    point by point
    question and answer
    compare and contrast
    120s
    Edit
    Delete

Teachers give this quiz to your class